How to Use Also and Too

Also and too are two words are easily confused and have similar meanings. However, they don’t have the exact same meaning. Learning how to use also and too correctly will get you closer to fluency!

ALSO

How to Use It

“Also” is used in positive sentences, to show agreement or something in common.

Alice can join us. Helene can also join us.
Mahmoud speaks French. Renata also speaks French.
Leilani likes to read novels. She also likes to read poetry.
He is also becoming a teacher.
We were also there.

Where to Place It

         “Also” comes before a single action verb.

Renata also speaks French.
She also likes to read poetry.

Except… “Also” comes after a modal or “to be” verb, and before the infinitive.

We were also there.
Helene can also join us.
He is also becoming a teacher.

TOO

How to Use It

 a. “Too” is used in positive sentences, to show agreement. In most cases, the meaning is the same as “also”. However, you may notice something different about its place in the sentence.

Alice can join us. Helene can join us too.
Mahmoud speaks French. Renata speaks French too.
Leilani likes to read novels. She likes to read poetry too.
He is becoming a teacher too.
We were there too.

b. “Too” is used to modify adjectives. In a negative use, it means that something is a higher degree than is desirable of the adjective. In a positive or less strong use, it means very. This is a use that “also” doesn’t have.

My tea is too hot to drink.
One chair was too big, another was too small, but the third was just right.
Sometimes you can have too much of a good thing.
Thank you for your help, you’re too kind.

Where to Place It

 a. “Too” comes at the end of the sentence or phrase that it refers to.

Helene can join us too.
We were there too.

b. When used to modify an adjective, “too” comes before the adjective it modifies.

My tea is too hot to drink.
One chair was too big, another was too small
...you’re too kind

Hopefully this has helped clear up how to use too and also.

Also, you can learn more about our intensive English courses, in which you can get an even better grasp of English, no matter what your level.

You can learn about other confusing pairs, too. Read about the difference between since and for and how to combine sentences, to practice even more grammar.

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